Flat foot in adults can arise from a variety of causes. Here are the most common:

  • An abnormality that is present from birth
  • Stretched or torn tendons
  • Damage or inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon (PTT), which connects from your lower leg, along your ankle, to the middle of the arch
  • Broken or dislocated bones
  • Some health conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis
  • Nerve problems

Other factors that can increase your risk include:

  • shutterstock_205072693-Flat-Foot-WEBObesity
  • Traumatic injury to your foot or ankle
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Aging

One of the most frequently affected tendons in the foot, is the posterior tibial tendon, a structure that is normally hard at work, throughout the contact phase of gait (when the foot is in contact with the ground).

You may experience the following symptoms:

  • Feet tire easily
  • Painful or achy feet, especially in the areas of the arches and heels
  • The inside bottom of your feet become swollen
  • Foot movement, such as standing on your toes, is difficult
  • Back and leg pain

If your flatfeet are painful, your Podiatrist might suggest:

  • Arch supports (orthotic devices): Your Podiatrist might suggest custom-designed arch supports, which are moulded to the contours of your feet. Arch supports won’t cure flatfeet, but they often reduce symptoms.
  • Stretching exercises: Some people with flatfeet also have a shortened Achilles tendon. Exercises to stretch this tendon may help.
  • Proper shoe wear: A structurally supportive shoe may be better tolerated than sandals or shoes with minimal support.